Monday, June 7, 2010

Organic? I think NOT!

So today @ Caribou I decided to do some research on a subject I particularly find interesting, the USDA Organic label. I found some disturbing results. The short logical conclusion is that the "USDA Organic" label means absolutely nothing at all. It's logically now a marketing ploy to increase prices. Why? Because there are 38 allowable SYNTHETIC ingredients allowed in processed foods and still able to retain the "USDA Organic" label. Lets not forget processed free glutamic acids which are considered non-synthetic by the USDA and the Agricultural Appropriations bill. The excerpt which you need to see:

(b) Synthetics allowed:

Activated charcoal (CAS #s 7440–44–0; 64365–11–3)—only from vegetative sources; for use only as a filtering aid.

Alginates.

Ammonium bicarbonate—for use only as a leavening agent.

Ammonium carbonate—for use only as a leavening agent.

Ascorbic acid.

Calcium citrate.

Calcium hydroxide.

Calcium phosphates (monobasic, dibasic, and tribasic).

Carbon dioxide.

Cellulose—for use in regenerative casings, as an anti-caking agent (non-chlorine bleached) and filtering aid.

Chlorine materials—disinfecting and sanitizing food contact surfaces, Except, That, residual chlorine levels in the water shall not exceed the maximum residual disinfectant limit under the Safe Drinking Water Act (Calcium hypochlorite; Chlorine dioxide; and Sodium hypochlorite).

Cyclohexylamine (CAS # 108–91–8)—for use only as a boiler water additive for packaging sterilization.

Diethylaminoethanol (CAS # 100–37–8)—for use only as a boiler water additive for packaging sterilization.

Ethylene—allowed for postharvest ripening of tropical fruit and degreening of citrus.

Ferrous sulfate—for iron enrichment or fortification of foods when required by regulation or recommended (independent organization).

Glycerides (mono and di)—for use only in drum drying of food.

Glycerin—produced by hydrolysis of fats and oils.

Hydrogen peroxide.

Lecithin—bleached.

Magnesium carbonate—for use only in agricultural products labeled “made with organic (specified ingredients or food group(s)),” prohibited in agricultural products labeled “organic”.

Magnesium chloride—derived from sea water.

Magnesium stearate—for use only in agricultural products labeled “made with organic (specified ingredients or food group(s)),” prohibited in agricultural products labeled “organic”.

Nutrient vitamins and minerals, in accordance with 21 CFR 104.20, Nutritional Quality Guidelines For Foods.

Octadecylamine (CAS # 124–30–1)—for use only as a boiler water additive for packaging sterilization.

Ozone.

Pectin (low-methoxy).

Peracetic acid/Peroxyacetic acid (CAS # 79–21–0)—for use in wash and/or rinse water according to FDA limitations. For use as a sanitizer on food contact surfaces.

Phosphoric acid—cleaning of food-contact surfaces and equipment only.

Potassium acid tartrate.

Potassium carbonate.

Potassium citrate.

Potassium hydroxide—prohibited for use in lye peeling of fruits and vegetables except when used for peeling peaches during the Individually Quick Frozen (IQF) production process.

Potassium iodide—for use only in agricultural products labeled “made with organic (specified ingredients or food group(s)),” prohibited in agricultural products labeled “organic”.

Potassium phosphate—for use only in agricultural products labeled “made with organic (specific ingredients or food group(s)),” prohibited in agricultural products labeled “organic”.

Silicon dioxide.

Sodium acid pyrophosphate (CAS # 7758–16–9)—for use only as a leavening agent.

Sodium citrate.

Sodium hydroxide—prohibited for use in lye peeling of fruits and vegetables.

Sodium phosphates—for use only in dairy foods.

Sulfur dioxide—for use only in wine labeled “made with organic grapes,” Provided, That, total sulfite concentration does not exceed 100 ppm.

Tartaric acid—made from malic acid.

Tetrasodium pyrophosphate (CAS # 7722–88–5)—for use only in meat analog products.

Tocopherols—derived from vegetable oil when rosemary extracts are not a suitable alternative.

Xanthan gum.

(c)–(z) [Reserved]

[68 FR 61993, Oct. 31, 2003, as amended as 68 FR 62217, Nov. 3, 2003; 71 FR 53302, Sept. 11, 2006; 72 FR 58473, Oct. 16, 2007; 73 FR 59481, Oct. 9, 2008]

The source: The Electronic Code of Federal Regulations

Congratulations America, you've been DUPED! Now we can all laugh with the rest of the corporate community! HAHA! For the people by the people? No no, For the Corporations by the Government! Here Here!